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Rigg's Cabinet of Curiosities

curated by Thornton Rigg

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Ravilious & Co : Compton Verney

Rigg's Cabinet of Curiosities

… a fascinating exhibition …

horse design westbury england

This marvellous show traces the story of a dynamic group of British artist/designers from the first half of the 20th century. Taking a collective approach, the two major gallery spaces of Compton Verney are absolutely crammed full of paintings and woodcuts, fabric prints, book covers, ceramics and wallpapers,

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The Ghost A Cultural History : Susan Owens

Yesterday I listened enthralled as Susan gave a talk at the Chipping Campden Literature Festival about the book.

Rigg's Cabinet of Curiosities

… a fascinating book to curl up with … 

ghost supernatural spooks halloweenThe Ghost is a thoroughly fascinating book which traces the development of ghosts from warnings from the afterlife, through escapees from purgatory and then the devil’s playthings and finally to delicious, terrifying entertainment purely from the imagination.

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Portraits: Diana Low & William Nicholson

Rigg's Cabinet of Curiosities

… two portraits of an affair …

diana British artistDiana Low, a student painter, was heavily influenced by William Nicholson. They had a short affair as recalled later by her brother in law. 

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Thornhill : Pam Smy

Congratulations to Pam Smy – Thornhill has been nominated for The CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal 2018. This is the only British prize to solely reward children’s book illustration.

Rigg's Cabinet of Curiosities

… perfectly paced and other worldly …

halloween ghost thornhill

This is a perfectly paced ghost story about a girl living next to a derelict orphanage.

Pam Smy carefully weaves together the stories of two girls in a beguiling mix of diary and illustration. The ghost, Mary, writes heartbreaking entries of her bleak childhood in the diary which is discovered years later by the lonely Ella, whose story is told entirely through unscripted illustrations. With no narrator to help, we are left to piece together the gaps in each story.

Pam then intersperses the diary entries and cartoon narrative with heavy black pages to represent sleep. The cumulative effect of these blanks, combined with the silent illustrations, recreates the detachedness of a lonely childhood and gives the reader delightful pause to think about and guess (deliciously) what might happen next.

The whole effect is intriguing, creepy and otherworldly by turn and builds to…

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